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CONTEMPORARY ZEN PRACTICE AND INQUIRY

Clearness Committee

WHAT IS the CLEARNESS COMMITTEE?

Since 2011, several members of the Appamada Sangha have regularly convened to create a Clearness Committee (originally a Quaker process) based on the form and insights of Parker Palmer in his book, A Hidden Wholeness.

Are you holding an important question about your life or work that you have been longing to unravel? Or perhaps you have the desire or curiosity to deepen your understanding of your personal journey? If this resonates with you, a Clearness Committee may be called to gather in support of your curiosity and/or decision making. From 3-10 trained committee members will gather with you, holding the understanding that every person has within him or her their own inherent wisdom, rather than necessarily seeking direct advice or guidance. Committee members commit to deep listening, asking honest and open questions and avoid advice-giving and amateur psychoanalysis. The committee will never offer any suggestions for solutions or next steps. Our aspiration is for the shy soul to come forward in a safe and loving space and find it’s own truth. We also commit to double confidentiality. Nothing about your personal process will be discussed afterwards--not between members or others or even with you, unless you request to do so.

WHO CAN CALL A CLEARNESS COMMITTEE?

The convening of the Clearness Committee for a 2-hour engagement of hearts can be requested by anyone inside or outside the Appamada sangha.

HOW DO I CALL UP A CLEARNESS COMMITTEE?

Contact Barbara Miller (contact info below) and she will organize the members, and handle scheduling & location.

WHO ARE THE MEMBERS OF THE CLEARNESS COMMITTEE?

Barbara Miller (Contact person): bmiller517@gmail.com

Sunni Brown: sunnibrown@me.com
Kebana Frost: kebanaf@hotmail.com
Margaret Keys: mk@margaretkeys.com
Mary Beth Laye: marybethlaye@gmail.com
Clayton Maxwell: claytonmaxwellsloan@ gmail.com
Lila Parish: playparr@gmail.com
Liz Young: liz@vascocu.com
Elizabeth Kubala: elizabethkubala@gmail.com

Email the group:

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APPAMADA BOARD

Our Schedule

Welcome! These programs are open for everyone.

Monday—Friday 6:30-7:30 AM
Morning Zazen

Sunday 8:00-11:00 AM
Zazen, service, and dharma talk

Sunday 8:00-9:00 AM
Newcomer orientation

Tuesday 12:30-1:30 PM
Inquiry

Wednesday 7:30-8:45 PM
Wednesday evening program

More activities can be found on the Appamada Calendar

Ethics and Grievance Policy

Our Location

913 East 38th St
Austin, TX 78705 (Map)

Affiliated Sanghas

About Parking

Please be mindful of our neighbors. Additional Parking is available in the Cafe Hornitos parking lot at the corner of 38th St. and the I-35 frontage road, one block east of Appamada.

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One who is awakened to the Tao doesn’t need any encouragement to be compassionate. I sometimes hear people say that they believe everything about Buddhism, but they just can’t be so compassionate. They all have this idea that being compassionate means crying about every little thing that’s even remotely sad or touching. That is not compassion; that is some sort of imbalance of the nervous system or weak liver or kidney energy which causes one to easily feel moved or shed tears. One with real compassion and bodhicitta has hoary eyebrows and fiery eyes. Compassion and bodhicitta are the might and ire of a great king who brings peace to the land. In the language of those who worship the Immortals, it is called “inside saint, outside king.” Such a one has the heart and wisdom of a saint but functions in the world as a king or great leader. In Buddhism, the heart or substance is Tao, enlightenment, prajna, and so forth. Bodhicitta functions in the world as great compassion, loving all beings and helping to liberate all beings. It is not sitting all alone in a temple in the woods or being completely aloof from all others."
—Nan Huai-chin : The Diamond Sutra Explained